Veterans Benefits Planning

VA-Accredited Elder Law Attorney

In recognition of their service to the nation, the United States provides financial help to wartime veterans who need long-term care. While the Veteran’s Administration (VA) offers numerous veterans’ benefits programs, there is one little-known program that can greatly improve the lives of elderly veterans and their surviving spouses in need of medical assistance and care that does not require the veteran to have a service-related disability.

Perhaps the most underutilized veterans benefits program is the VA’s Pension Program. Unfortunately, you will see no billboards nor hear any radio advertisements informing veterans or their spouses that they may be entitled to receive this important benefit. The Pension Program benefits can be used by veterans and/or their surviving spouses to help finance the costs incurred for in-home medical care, assisted living facility costs, and nursing home costs. Veterans Pension Planning can provide monthly cash benefits to wartime veterans or their surviving spouses who meet financial and medical criteria.

The eligibility requirements for the Pension Program are dramatically different than other veterans’ benefits programs. As a result, many veterans believe that they are not eligible for the Pension Program or simply do not fully understand the eligibility requirements.

The Pension Program has three tiers of benefits, including the “Basic Pension” benefit, the “Housebound” benefit, and the “Aid and Attendance” benefit. Each tier has its own eligibility requirements and benefits limits.

All three benefits require the veteran to have served at least 90 days, with the service period occurring during one or more of the following wartimes:

  • World War II: December 7, 1941 through December 31, 1946
  • Korean War: June 27, 1950 through January 31, 1955
  • Vietnam War: August 5, 1964 through May 7, 1975; however, February 28, 1961 through May 7, 1975, for a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period
  • Gulf War: August 2, 1990 through a future date to be set by law or Presidential Proclamation

If the veteran entered active duty after September 7, 1980, generally the veteran must have served at least 24 months or the full period for which called or ordered to active duty (there are exceptions to this rule).

Haiman Hogue, PLLC, can help you take advantage of the VA’s Pension Program. We are accredited by the Department for Veterans Affairs, which authorizes our attorneys to provide veterans and their families with advice on complex areas of the law on long-term care planning including VA pension benefits and related Medicaid benefits.

Would you like to speak with a VA-Accredited Elder Law attorney about your veterans’ benefits? Please feel free to schedule a time to speak with one of the veterans planning professionals at HAIMAN HOGUE, PLLC today:

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